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American Airlines Mistreated Emotional Support Dog

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Date16 Aug 2019
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Comment0
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American Airlines Mistreated Emotional Support DogAvigail Diveroli has filed a lawsuit against American Airlines, alleging that they confined her emotional support dog in a bathroom.

Diveroli, who claims she suffers from severe anxiety and requires an emotional support animal, said she called the airline twice ahead of time and that they assured her that her dog, Simba could sit in business class with her and her family.

However, things didn’t go so smoothly when Diveroli got on the plane. The lawsuit claims a flight attendant yelled at Diveroli on the plane and told her that her dog couldn’t be in the cabin because it’s an FAA violation. The flight attendant allegedly downgraded Diveroli from business class and put the dog in the bathroom.

“This is a terrible case where AA completely ignored the mental anguish of a passenger, ignored their own carrier agreement with passengers, and violated every standard of decency,” the suit said, noting that the woman was pregnant at the time. “Regina [the flight attendant] yelled at Plaintiff and her husband the whole trip, even stating so much that the dog is not allowed to be wrapped with an AA blanket.”

Other flight attendants allegedly apologized for Regina’s behavior and called her a sour apple. Although police escorted Diveroli off the plane upon landing, they determined there was no crime.

American Airlines released a statement about the lawsuit:

“FAA regulations require pets to stay in kennels that fit under the seat, however, this kennel didn’t fit under the seat. The flight crew tried to handle the situation in accordance with FAA regulations,” the statement said. “Also, this travel was booked on a 777, which doesn’t allow pets in the premium cabin. Our team at the airport in Miami offered to rebook the passenger on a later flight, but they declined, and opted to take a seat with the pet in the main cabin.”

Diveroli is seeking at least $75,000 in damages and a jury trial.

 

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